30 College Recruiting Red Flags

by: Nate Trosky

nate_trosky

 

Over the the last 15 years I’ve had the opportunity to work over 150 college recruiting events and professional scouting combines. From these events I have noted 30 recruiting red flags, complaints from the college coaches and scouts concerning high school prospects. I encourage high school prospects and their parents to read the list below and make note of the individual red flags. Being conscious of each area will ultimately increasing a player’s odds of being recruited. As a coach and scout, I communicate to my players that, “the college coaches are in the bushes and the scouts are in the tree,” meaning someone always watching them!” A player’s character is the true separator and definer of how fare they will go in this game and in life, and character can be defined as what someone does when nobody is looking, or at least when they think nobody is looking.

30 College Recruiting Red Flags

  1. Addressing an email to a college coach by either calling him Coach, without his first name and or by spelling his name wrong.
  2. Sending emails to college coaches that are lengthy, with too much information.
  3. Getting in trouble outside of baseball fostering a reputation that reaches college coaches.
  4. Attending a college recruiting camp with sagging pants, untied shoes, wearing headphones or with a non baseball hairdo.
  5. On a official visit, asking current players what the party scene is like and where to find girls.
  6. During a college visit, acting rude to a parent or family member.
  7. Throwing gear after getting upset during a game.
  8. Un-coachable attitude when a coach is advising, teaching techniques or training.
  9. Looking like a thug in your uniform.
  10. Being seen at the yard with a hat on backwards.
  11. At a college prospect camp, a player disrespecting his high school coach in front of the college coaches.
  12. Player seen eating a poor diet at a showcase or tournament, especially if he appears to be struggling with weight problems.
  13. Overly involved parents or family members. Parents that are too attached, controlling, or speak for their kids when a college coach asks the player questions.
  14. At a high school or travel ball game, a player asking his parents for drinks/snacks.
  15. Lack of self control, revealing negative emotions through poor body language when things aren’t going right on the field.
  16. Complaining or disrespect toward umpires or coaches.
  17. Inconsistent effort of hustle running to 1B.
  18. Low GPA.
  19. Low test scores.
  20. Player’s dad carrying his bat bag or equipment .
  21. Mom applying sunscreen to the player’s face.
  22. Colorful language, poor attitude or images of debauchery on social media.
  23. Showing up late, anytime.
  24. Not being prepared at a college camp, forgetting belt etc..
  25. Verbally committing early, getting lazy, not improving or reaching one’s projection.
  26. Player rolling their bag into the park on wheels.
  27. After verbally committing to a college on a baseball scholarship, and then decomitting.
  28. Lack of commitment to a club or high school team. For example, playing on numerous team at once and being unreliable.
  29. Showing off, boasting, or other ego-driven actions that degrade a team collaboration.
  30. Rounding up on GPA, test scores, and or baseball statistics

Nate Trosky

Nate Trosky, owner and founder of Trosky Baseball, is employed by the Milwaukee Brewers and serves as a consultant for the German National team, the Southern California Area Code team, the North South Team, and Team USA (NTIS). He has served and, for many, continues to serve as a consultant for West-Coast colleges and universities (e.g. Stanford, USC, Cal Poly, San Diego State, Santa Clara, Sonoma State, Cal State Monterey Bay, USF, and others). His coaching endeavors have taken him around the world to South Africa, the Dominican Republic, China, Mexico, Germany, Italy, Belgium, Croatia, and the Czech Republic.

Coach Trosky has coached in Europe professionally and has coached with both the Croatian and German National teams. He has been an assistant coach in 3 North American minor leagues (Northern, Western and North-East).

At Hawaii Pacific University, he received All-American and Scholar Athlete awards. He holds a Masters Degree in Christian Leadership, Youth / Family Development.

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